Having the opportunity to visit Victoria & Albert Museum it took me literally in the years  of 60s- 70s which I love the most see the actual garment that she created and the cosmetics, fashion dolls, the shoes, the photography the fashion magazines where her designs was published, was absolutely fascinated.

The short story of Mary Quant quite impress me a lot how she open the door of the youth culture, I liked her fun vibe expression and how she was designing the clothes how she present her garments in a fashion show laughing, funny and dancing, the short hair style & make up the big dolls eyes that she wanted the most to pop up on her models.

1966-73 ‘Girls will be boys’ – I didn’t want to grow up, perhaps that’s something to do with it! – Marry Quant.

 Seeing the evolution of cosmetics the cartoon strip which they use as a tutorial was quite revolutionary.

Quant wanted “relaxed clothes suited to the actions of normal life”.

“ Banana Split” 1967 – the mini dresses that Quant is often credited with inventing the decade’s most iconic look it became her own signature. Paring short tunic dresses tights in bright, stand-out colours- red, green and beige – I like that she created a bold, high-fashion version of the practical outfits she’d worn as a chid at school and at dance  that were popularised  by the era’s most high-profile model Twiggy, whose willowy figure helped turn super-short hemlines into an international trend.

‘X- Certificate’-  1969 This wet-look catsuit with jeans style top stitching and matching fly cap were made from anew stretchy synthetic fabrics the perfect look for emphasising an athletic body I found it very fashionable even now in this days as jumpsuit that can be where in any occasion that you feel is suitable.

‘’Arundel’’ Separates 1973 the name of the outfit, inspired by Arundel Castle, emphasised the classic appeal of this Marry Quant design. 

Mary Quant design